Vaccination Questions, Concerns, and Answers

baby receiving vaccinationA new baby brings many things, including frequent trips to the pediatrician. After several newborn visits, most pediatricians will schedule to see your baby at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months.

These visits focus on your baby’s growth and development. Pediatricians generally track growth (weight gain and length), as well as cognitive, emotional, and social development.

Unfortunately, most of these visits also include inoculations.

Primarily, these shots consist of vaccines designed to protect your baby from serious health issues (i.e. polio) and other traditional childhood diseases (i.e. chickenpox).

Have you heard about the vaccine discussion? If not, chances are, you soon will.

This conversation revolves around:

  • How many and what vaccines does a baby really need?
  • Is there a possible impact to a child’s health from vaccines? Specifically, some have argued that there may be a possible link between autism and vaccines. It is very important to note that, as of date, there is no scientific research that, validates this possible connection.

As parents, your first priority is to keep your baby safe. This means being an effective advocate for your child. It means asking questions and even challenging authority when we believe our baby may be at risk.

Pediatricians share in this responsibility. Pediatricians provide information and recommendations to parents regarding the health of their baby. It is always a good idea to interview several pediatricians, talking with them about their philosophy and the partnership that they have with parents. You should choose the pediatrician that will best work with you to provide care for your child and respect your questions and concerns.

It is worthwhile to take time, review, and understand the vaccines which are recommended for children.

Whether you have or haven’t done any research, as a parent, you can:

  • Take the advice of your pediatrician. Period. Most pediatricians follow the vaccine schedule as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • Talk with your pediatrician and look for alternatives to a traditional vaccine schedule. For instance, you may be confident in having your child vaccinated, but may decide you would like to follow a slightly altered (or delayed) vaccine schedule. Such a schedule may reduce the number of shots at each visit. However, this type of schedule may also have you visiting your pediatrician more often, perhaps leading to additional costs.

The vaccination conversation…it may be a conversation worth having.

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What do you think?

Vaccination Questions, Concerns, and Answers

Tell us what you think!

8 comments

  1. Timothy says:

    Not looking forward to the next round.. Pretty sure it is my turn to hold Meeka.

  2. Timothy says:

    We are goin to do it all.

  3. sheenaholman says:

    I need to do more research.

  4. Why not? I don’t want it for my girls but the preschool is giving me a hard time for not allowing my 4 y/o to have it. I feel as if I fighting against the world. 🙁

  5. Nella3137 says:

    Great info, the only thing I dont have done is the flu shot.

  6. Corley says:

    what about the first dentist apppointment?

  7. brandy says:

    great information

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