4 Magazines All Moms Should Read

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Image via Galit Breen

I spent a lot of my youth flipping through magazines—Teen Beat, Seventeen, Glamour—some were better for me than others.

As days spent in my childhood home gave way to a college dorm, my nose was buried in hardcover textbooks rather than the glossy pages of magazines.

And as an adult, when I made way back to the reading format of my youth, my interests changed from teen idols and the best ways to use Sun-In, to play dates and milestones, home décor and stories of motherhood.

As my kids get older and my days get busier, I still love the feel of magazine pages between my fingertips and crave the stories within them.

Here are four magazines that I'm smitten with right now.

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Image via Brain, Child

Brain, Child

Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers, founded in 1999, is an award-winning literary magazine dedicated to motherhood. Each issue contains personal essays, a short story, poetry, debates, book reviews, and news. Contributors have included Pulitzer Prize-winning novelists, best-selling authors, acclaimed writers, and most importantly (to me) mothers who tell their stories with irreverent, raw honesty. Brain, Child is known for tackling real issues that mothers are thinking about with well-crafted, poignant writing. 

The magazine strives to bring together the many voices of women from different backgrounds, circumstances, and experiences in a way that provides mothers with insight and perspective into real issues. Thirteen years after its launch, Brain, Child is still often referred to as “The New Yorker for Mothers.”

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Brain, Child is distributed in independent bookstores, Barnes & Noble superstores, and select grocery stores around the U.S. and Canada. The magazine is also available for the iPad from the Apple Newsstand.

Subscriptions and sample copies can be ordered at Brain, Child.

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Image via Mamalode

Mamalode Magazine

Mamalode began with a party for moms the night before Mother’s Day — Mother’s Day Eve®. The annual event grew from a small group of friends to a large public event with 500 moms and moms-to-be, and a long list of business sponsors. Now moms across the country celebrate this night with events big and small. Turns out Mamalode publishers may have invented a holiday.

In 2009, Mamalode published the first local print edition of Mamalode magazine, today they have an international community of readers and writers, an ad free version of their Greatest Hits on iPad, and a print collection of 18 issues.

Mamalode is known for publishing with passion on subjects readers care deeply about. Smart, witty, heart-breaking, poignant, raw, edgy, and beautiful have all been used to describe Mamalode writing and photography.

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Mamalode has been called “America’s BEST parenting magazine” by Lisa Stone, the CEO of BlogHer and its editors are quoted as saying, “We collect the best of the blogosphere, mash it up with MFA programs and mix it with our readers' killer submissions. And through a little curation, a lot of love for content and design and the wonders of modern motherhood, we deliver Mamalode.”

Subscriptions and single issues can be purchased at Mamalode.

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Image via Tin House

Tin House

“Tin House is an invaluable repository of fine American writing and American fiction, presented in a crisp and entertaining visual format.”
—Stephen King

The first issue of Tin House magazine arrived in the spring of 1999—the singular lovechild of an eclectic literary journal and a beautiful glossy magazine. Publisher Win McCormack said of the effort, “I wanted to create a literary magazine for the many passionate readers who are not necessarily literary academics or publishing professionals.”

Today, Tin House is an established literary journal, publishing essays as well as poetry and fiction all exploring story (and truth) telling.

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With fiction, poetry, and essays, Tin House's favorite writers talk craft in their Interviews department and expand readers' must-read lists in their “Lost and Found” section. Their “Readable Feasts” and “Blithe Spirits” share appetizing recipes and delicious stories to go along with them. Tin House's goal is to expand horizons with every theme issue, where they've honed their sights on topics ranging from work to appetites to just plain evil.

Magazines can be purchased at Tin House.

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Image via Granta

Granta Magazine

Since 1979 Granta Magazine has published many of the world’s finest writers tackling some of the world’s most important subjects, from intimate human experiences to the large public and political events that have shaped our lives.

Granta doesn’t have a political or literary manifesto, but it does have a belief in the power and urgency of the story, both in fiction and non-fiction, and the story’s supreme ability to describe, illuminate, and make real. 

As the Observer wrote of Granta, “In its blend of memoirs and photojournalism, and in its championing of contemporary realist fiction, Granta has its face pressed firmly against the window, determined to witness the world.”

You can buy issues or subscriptions at Granta

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What magazines did you love in your youth? Which ones do you read today?

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4 Magazines All Moms Should Read

Galit Breen is the author of Kindness Wins, a simple no-nonsense guide to teaching our kids how to be kind online. She has a master's degree in education and a bachelor's degree in human development and was a classroom and reading teacher for ten years. In 2009, she launched a career as a freelance writer entrenched in social media. Since then, her work has been featured in various online magazines including Brain, Child, The Huffington Post, TIME, and xoJane. Breen lives in Minnesota with her h ... More

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