Pumping Milk? Tips for New Moms

pump

Your decision to breastfeed is significant in your baby's life. Not only will your baby be privy to all the bountiful antibodies in breast milk; but also, studies conclude that breastfeeding gives your baby all the tools he will need for a successful life today and in the future. Many moms who breastfeed find themselves facing a return to work or other unforeseen circumstances that can threaten an early end to this once in a lifetime opportunity. Some moms may feel discouraged that breastfeeding makes them ultimately responsible, and often tied to their babies early in life. Regardless of the case, breastfeeding moms are often looking for ways to successfully pump milk so that their child can maintain the benefits of breast milk, yet can return to work or feel comfortable leaving the baby with other caregivers.

If you worry that you aren't producing enough milk for your baby, then pumping may help to actually increase your production.

Today, there are a high quality breast pumps on the market that can make pumping not just easy, but desirable. Pumping can also help to solve some problems such as sore nipples, breast infection, or the lack of enough milk that can attack early in breastfeeding. Finding the right breast pump for you however may not be that easy. The first thing you will notice is that the cost differences span hundreds of dollars. From the simple hand pump models to the high tech ones, some cost upwards of $300. Know your needs. If you need to pump just occasionally, you may find that a smaller and less expensive model will work just fine. If you will pump exclusively, your best bet is to bite the bullet and invest in an electronic machine.

{ MORE: Moms Can Now Find Out Exactly What Is In Their Breast Milk }

Adjusting to pumping can be difficult, but there are a few tips that will make it easier. Some women do not experience let down without the baby. If this is you, than viewing pictures of your baby may help. Another thing to do, is to always feed by breast when possible, this will ensure your that your baby doesn't suffer from nipple confusion (common when switching between the two) but can also help you maintain adequate milk supply. To keep your supply pumping freely, make sure that you pump often, every few hours is best. This way your milk will balance supply and demand, and as your baby demands more you won't have problems supplying it.

If you worry that you aren't producing enough milk for your baby, then pumping may help to actually increase your production. You can save the milk or not, however saving it is an easy fix to the supply and demand problems that new moms face.

{ MORE: 3 Things That Have Made My Life as a Triple Feeding Mom SO Much Easier }

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If you have to return to work, hand expressing or hand pump models may not be your best choice. They take a little longer to produce results and are less discreet than electronic models. Also, make sure to you bring a cooler with you to house the bottles so that co-workers, who might feel uncomfortable with it, aren't forced to look at bottles of breast milk in the company fridge. You can easily put your bottles into the cooler and store the entire package in the fridge.

What do you think?

Pumping Milk? Tips for New Moms

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10 comments

  1. Jblair12 says:

    check with your insurance company first before you go out and buy a pump on your own. Due to some of the changes in the health care reform, all insurance companies are required to provide SOME TYPE of breast pump, although they are not required necessarily to be electric pumps or double pumps. Still, many companies are providing double electric pumps. I’ve seen women obtain brands like madela, ameda, playtex and hygeia without having to pay a single dime for it. Give it a shot.

  2. RANECIA says:

    i will be pumping soon since i will be working i hope my child still takes my breast. did anyone do pump and breast feed too and still have the same results?

  3. kalivt says:

    I would ask for one for your shower. YOu never know. Especially if you want your husband to be able to help out, or if you have to goto work. It’s a much better alternative that formula

  4. kalivt says:

    With my firt child, I pumped all the time.
    I was a working mom and refused to have my daughter drinking formula! At first it was slow but, I had a great dual side Medula and eventually got to 12 oz on each side!
    I feel it is the next best thing to the boob.
    I will do the same for this child on the way since I am planning on being a FT student and working as well. We al can’t be so luck to stay at home for the first year.
    If you can afford a good pump I advise you get it. I spent over $200 dollars on mine. After going through a couple cheap ones.

  5. life says:

    not sure if i will use one but this is helping me a lot

  6. Aiden says:

    Wondering if I will need one

  7. great tips very useful

  8. MamaCat says:

    Pumping was a pain in the rear for the frustration it could cause but so worth it. All of these are great tips!

  9. EbyMom says:

    good to know. thanx

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