How is Amblyopia (Lazy Eye) Treated?

Doctor Examining Child's Eyes In Doctor's Office

Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is most effectively diagnosed and treated before the age of five. But once lazy eye is diagnosed, what are the treatment options?

{ MORE:  What is Amblyopia? }

According to the College of Optometrists in Vision Development, there are three courses of treatment available to patients who suffer from amblyopia:

  1. glasses or contact lenses, to reduce stress on the weaker eye;
  2. eye patches, fogging lenses, or eye drops in the stronger eye; and
  3. vision therapy, to balance the vision in both eyes.
The treatment plan will depend on the age, needs, and individual condition of your child.

Each of these treatments can be used on their own, or in combination with another treatment. Any underlying issues that are causing the lazy eye will need to be corrected, before treatment for amblyopia can begin.

For example, if your child has a cataract in one of his or her eyes, the cataract will need to be removed. If strabismus is a factor in your child’s lazy eye, your child’s doctor might recommend surgery on the eye muscles to fix it.

Once any problems like these are resolved, treatment for amblyopia can begin.

Glasses or Contact Lenses

Corrective lenses are most commonly used in patients who suffer from amblyopia in both eyes, but may also be used in conjunction with an eye patch. According to the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS), glasses alone will not correct vision to 20/20 when amblyopia is found in only one eye. 

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How is Amblyopia (Lazy Eye) Treated?

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7 comments

  1. LIZ says:

    good reading tnx 🙂

  2. mommy nhoj says:

    Now, this scares me. I need to do more research on amblyopia!

  3. Cindy says:

    My daughter, now 32 years old was born w/ amblyopia. The only pediatric opthomalogist in town kept telling us to come back in 3 months; and that if it has not corrected itself by the time she turned 5 we would need to have her use a patch.
    Now she is legally blind. I keep hearing that he should have been treating her eye from early on and that waiting until 5 years old took away the opportunity to correct her situation!
    If an opthamalogist says it can be corrected by surgery now, should we sue our first eye doctor for the amount to cover her surgery?
    We are not the type to sue anyone, but every time I think about her never having a full visual capacity and how she was treated, I feel as if I have failed her and feel ill to my stomach!

  4. Cindy says:

    NEED SOME INPUT!

  5. gfeld says:

    Now my daughter has this issue as well. She is patching so far to help it and she has glasses, as well. My program is too hard for a 5 year old to do.

  6. gfeld says:

    I have a program to help my lazy eye.

  7. Timothy says:

    I had this when i was a youngster

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