Heat Illness

Two happy sisters under colorful umbrella in park

Heat Stroke

When symptoms progress to the level of heat stroke, you are having a life threatening medical emergency. The body loses its ability to regulate its temperature and can reach temperatures of 104°F or higher,which can cause brain damage and even death.

Hot summer days and excessive activity with heavy or restrictive clothing can lead to heat stroke or dehydration. Symptoms include unconsciousness, convulsion, difficulty breathing, temperature of 104°F or higher, confusion, severe restlessness, anxiety, rapid heart rate, sweating, skin that may be red, hot, and dry, severe vomiting, and diarrhea.

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Because of the severity of heat stroke, you need to call 911 immediately. Once help is on the way, you need to do whatever you can to lower the body temperature without sending the person into shock by using extreme cold. Move into an air conditioned area, out of sunlight, remove clothing, use cool (not cold) rags to moisten skin, and mist with a fan if possible. If the person stops breathing, begin rescue breathing, if possible. Do not give fever reducing medication, such as Tylenol, as they are not effective with heat stroke. Most experts also advise against giving anything to drink once they have progressed to heat stroke because, most of the time, the patient is unable to swallow on her own, and will most likely need IV intervention.

So, while sunny summer days can provide lots of opportunity for fun, remember to stay hydrated and take frequent cool-down breaks in the shade or in the water! If you begin to see signs of heat illness, remove yourself and get cooled down immediately.

Have you ever experienced symptoms of a heat-related illness? How did you feel; and how did you recover?

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Heat Illness

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5 comments

  1. Gema says:

    I tend to be cold all the time. My 10 month old on the other hand is always hot! So I have to be careful because even if I don’t feel hot, he does! So I make sure to dress him in lighter layers than I do for myself and I keep juices on hand with straws because he refuses to drink out of a sippy cup. He either drinks straight from the little gerber bottle or with coffee stirrers that I use as straws since they take less effort for him to use. At church, we don’t have air conditioning in the room we use but my mom goes on the same day and their room as air conditioned so he goes with grandma. On days when only my husband and I go to church, grandma babysits so that we don’t have to take him out because he drowns in sweat if he’s out in 70 degree weather for more than 10 minutes. Poor thing. This is a good article because it lets me know what to look out for. I always get scared I won’t notice if he’s getting too hot because he always seems hot and I am always cold. But I think we can get through it just fine.

  2. mommy nhoj says:

    I am kinda worried about the summer heat here in San Antonio, Texas. It’s gonna be our first summer here. Good to know information.

  3. LIZ says:

    good article tnx so much im keep this in mind for the summer

  4. Namaste says:

    It is much better to be safe !

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