Yes, Women Are Using Menstrual Cups to Get Pregnant

If you're a woman looking to conceive, chances are you, you've tried a lot of different strategies to get pregnant. From charting to fertility monitors to eating certain foods to cutting out certain foods to that little legs-up-in-the-air trick, there are a lot of different theories and suggestions floating around out there about the best way to get pregnant. 

But there's one strategy that you might not have heard about before that a lot of women are swearing by. What's the latest and greatest innovation in getting pregnant?

Menstrual cups.

Image via Unsplash/ Alicia Petresc

{ MORE: Are You Trying to Conceive? 7 Secrets to Get Pregnant Fast! }

Yup, you read that right.

Originally designed as an eco-friendly and more convenient way of dealing with your period, menstrual cups are now being flipped (literally) in a whole new way. How does it work? Well, essentially, women are having their partners ejaculate directly into the menstrual cup and then placing the menstrual cup into their vagina, close to the cervix. Or, women are having regular intercourse and then inserting the menstrual cup into their vaginas immediately after. 

Although regular intercourse will obviously get sperm into the vagina and near the cervix, the advantage of using a menstrual cup is that it essentially “blocks” the sperm from going anywhere but up. The menstrual cup serves as a literal seal, blocking them in to try to increase their chances of getting to the target of the egg. Those sperm have nowhere else to go, muhahahaha! 

According to an article in Parents, even fertility doctors are seeing patients use the menstrual cup as part of their trying-to-conceive strategy and although nothing can guarantee pregnancy, the menstrual cup method is a legitimate strategy that could help increase the chances of conception. Simply by reducing the opportunity for sperm to leak out or swim around in the wrong direction (hey, no one said sperm were super smart, right?) and increased the length of time that the sperm will be closer to the cervix. Technically speaking, sperm can usually live somewhere between three and five days in a woman's body, but you probably don't want to leave a menstrual cup swimming in sperm in your body for that long either. Instead, you could follow the menstrual cup's recommendations for maximum usage, which is usually up to 12 hours at a time.

If you're considering this, you'd most likely get the most benefit from the cup right after intercourse. Of course, you'll want to take care and make sure that your menstrual cup is being cleaned regularly and that you don't leave it in too long and keep watch for any complications; using a menstrual cup too often could put you at risk for an infection or yeast infection if it upsets the pH balance in your vagina. 

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Some women have reported that they've found the menstrual cup strategy to be especially effective after having sex at night, because they can insert the cup after intercourse and sleep with the cup in all night, then remove in the morning. They have a two-for-one, with no mess to clean up afterwards and a little extra boost for that sperm to stay put and do its job. And to further increase their chance of conception, some women are also using other conceiving strategies, such as taking Mucinex to increase their cervical mucus to help “catch” more sperm or using products like pre-seed. 

If you've never used a menstrual cup before, be warned that it can be a little tricky to get the hang of at first and it might even take a few different tries with different brands before you find one that works for your specific body. Not every fit is the same and not every vagina is the same, so if one feels absolutely uncomfortable, consider trying a different brand or even a different size. (Some cups are made for pre-children vaginas, if you get my drift.) 

In the end, if you have a menstrual cup already and you're currently looking to conceive or having trouble getting pregnant, using a menstrual cup might just be worth a shot. Many women have sworn that using a menstrual cup was a game-changer for them in finally getting pregnant and if nothing else, it's a risk-free, low-cost way to try to increase your chance of pregnancy, so really, what do you have to lose? 

{ MORE: Women are DIYing Their Own Toothpaste Pregnancy Tests }

Would you choose a menstrual cup for trying to conceive? 

What do you think?

Yes, Women Are Using Menstrual Cups to Get Pregnant

Chaunie Brusie is a writer, mom of four, and founder of The Stay Strong Mom, a community + gift box service for moms after loss. ... More

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