Using Social Media to Stand Against Bullies

     

Have you seen the posts on Facebook of people asking for likes and shares to convince their parents to get them a trip to Disney World or even help adult children find their birth children? Recently, a Wisconsin dad, Matthew Bent, took to Facebook to stand up for his son, Shiloh, when he was bullied at school and authorities said their hands were tied. The post has received overwhelming support from all over the world. It’s truly amazing how powerful social media is and how large its reach is.

Matthew claims that on March 25, Shiloh, a sixth grader, was body-slammed to the ground three times in his gym class. After physically accosting Shiloh, the bully stole his necklace, a special gift from his dad to mark his first year in Little League.

Matthew was upset and called the Wisconsin police to report the incident but was told that since Shiloh voluntarily entered the area where he was allegedly bullied there was nothing that could be done. As if by just being in the gym class, he was agreeing to be bullied; asking for it even.

Shiloh’s dad, Matthew, was so disgusted by the way the police brushed him off that on March 26th he decided to post a photo of himself, standing behind Shiloh holding a handwritten sign that said,

“I stand behind my son in the fight against bullying. Please ‘like’ and ‘share’ to send a message loud and clear that bullying needs to stop now. Tell school districts that protecting bullies by turning a blind eye is wrong. Shame on Kaukauna area schools for protecting a bully in their school.’’

The post quickly went viral, with more than 900,000 likes and shares.

I applaud this father. He is doing whatever it takes to call attention to the bullying and protect his son. There are so many parents that will meet the idea of bullying with, “It’s just a part of being a kid.” I do not agree with that way of believing at all. Someone terrorizing a child physically, verbally or emotionally is not a normal part of childhood. It is abuse and it is high time that the bully is called out for their unsavory behavior. They should be shamed. The burden should not fall on the victim.

Image courtesy of NBC

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Using Social Media to Stand Against Bullies

Deborah Cruz, @TruthfulMommy, is the creator of The TRUTH about Motherhood, an often humorous and brutally honest look at motherhood. She's a writer, a wife, and a work-at-home Mommy who's trying to do it all well. She live in the Midwest with her 2 little girls and her husband. She has a lot of degrees from a bunch of schools but mostly spends her days shuttling people under the age of 7, while trying to maintain her sanity and she wouldn't have it any other way. She talks a lot. She ... More

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1 comment

  1. Makayla says:

    It is high time that bullying be stopped, by whatever means necessary. It is torture to be bullied, I was for 6 years before I finally got into a new school. At 12 we had classes that told us bullying is wrong and that we could file a Harassment charges if we felt we needed to. After two years from the same perpetrators I asked my guidance counselor and she said, "Oh, I don’t think it’s that bad yet." My mother spoke with the school and she was told the same thing. She worked on me from home, telling me I was amazing and wonderful and beautiful, but the negative ones from 10 more peers at school really broke me. Part of the issue is that schools don’t tell parents or don’t want to reprimand a child who may be going through a lot at home, but that does not excuse this behavior. Schools and law enforcement need to care a little bit more instead of thinking it’s just a ‘phase’ and the child will get over it. Some don’t, and that’s not permissible, they go into adult life thinking they can bully their way into or out of anything, and these bullied kids go into adulthood not feeling good enough so they don’t share their great ideas with the world because they were always told they were worthless or stupid or ugly. And it is sad that schools don’t tell parents or tell parents not to worry about it. I will be sure, with my son, I am involved enough to know what’s happening and if the schools refuse to do anything about it, I will go straight to the child’s parent and make sure it is nipped in the bud, immediately. I will not let someone tell my little man that he is worthless, fat, ugly, stupid or anything of the sort, it does not create character or ‘toughness’ in children, it only results in psychiatry appointments and years of confidence building after the issue is over.

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