This Mom Is Going Viral for Her Anti-Vaccine Message

Ashley Everly is a mom on a mission to spread the word on what she believes is an important message: to share the danger of vaccinations.

And unlike a lot of moms who are “against” vaccines, Everly has a bit of a different platform because she is a scientist — a toxicologist to be exact. I know, it makes you take pause, right?

I have to admit that I am one of those moms who vaccinates her kids, but definitely worries about the safety of them all. It does seem like we give our kids an awful lot of vaccines these days and what are the real chances of my newborn needing that Hepatitis B vaccine an hour after birth?

I don’t think eradicable diseases that killed millions of people are anything to discount, but neither do I think are the stories of thousands of families who have proven vaccine injuries or are currently waiting for approval for compensation as a result of a vaccine injury. The point being, I try to keep an open mind about vaccines and listen to both “sides,” even though I don’t like to think of it as sides–I prefer to think we are all just trying to figure out what’s best for our kids, right?

Image via Free Digital Photos/ Sura Nualpradid

Everly went viral last month with a Facebook post from her page of the same name. The post was an open letter to her family and friends who were pro-vaccination and a plea for them to understand “her” side. She explained how she had started out as a medical professional who was in full support of vaccinations and had even vaccinated her own son, only to watch as he went on to suffer cognitive and neurological delays, as well as chronic food allergies and eczema. Of course, anectodical evidence of someone who has vaccinated and then went on to have symptoms is not how scientific research is based, which is exactly what Everly noted in her Facebook post. But in her mind, there is “real” data that proves that vaccines are not only not as effective as scientists say, but actually causing harm.

The only problem with what Everly is saying, however, is that she doesn’t actually show any of those real, peer-reviewed scientific studies that she claims exist and only advanced scientists like herself can see. I actually checked all of the sources she linked to her in her post and found no true studies that can prove anything, unfortunately. Perhaps the most interesting study she linked to was a study on how adjuncts (the ingredients in vaccines that serve as the travel agents for the vaccine components, such as aluminum) may be linked to an auto-immune syndrome after vaccinations. Unfortunately, that study was done in animals, so it’s hard to say if it can apply to humans as well.

Scientific evidence aside, in her post, Everly made a point to distinguish that there are no “good” and “bad” guys when we talk about vaccines; there are just people who have sorted through the evidence that they have available and made a decision based on that data.

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“The people on both sides of this debate — the majority of them are truly GOOD people,” she wrote. “The difference between us is that you believe the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks. And after years of research and/or witnessing our children suffer vaccine injury, we do not. There is passion and frustration on both sides, and we are coming from the same place with that frustration. We simply disagree on how to best protect our children.”

On the opposite side of women like Everly are moms who are sharing their stories of how they turned to trust vaccines, like Katie Joy, a mom who penned the essay, “I Planned to Be a Crunchy Mom, But Then My Baby Was Born Sick.” In the essay, Joy described how, during her pregnancy, she believed that vaccines were toxic and that she fully planned to live a very holistic lifestyle of essential oils only and nothing “toxic.”

And then, her baby was born with a neurological disorder, as well as a congenital heart defect, and a hormone balance. She literally needed modern-day science in order for her son to be able to live and seeing modern medicine in action and realizing how much she could trust doctors to keep her son alive changed her mind — because if we can trust science when things go wrong, why wouldn’t we trust them to help keep things right?

What do you think?

This Mom Is Going Viral for Her Anti-Vaccine Message

Chaunie Brusie is a writer, mom of four, and founder of The Stay Strong Mom, a community + gift box service for moms after loss. ... More

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