Baby Talk: Should You Be Worried About Your Baby’s Speech?

For most parents, concern about whether their child is meeting their milestones on time dominates their baby’s first year. From the little milestones, like tracking mom or dad across the room with their eyes, to the big ones, like taking first steps, every new skill is something to be celebrated!

So, what happens when your baby is a little late on one of their more highly anticipated milestones? If your baby isn’t talking yet (or is saying fewer words than their peers) you might be worried about their development. Check out the milestones below to assess whether your little one is on track!

speech
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Three Months

Babies begin hearing voices while they are still in the womb. By the time they are three months old, babies should be cooing, gooing, and making other sounds of ‘baby talk.’

Six Months

By six months of age, typically-developing babies begin making repetitive noises like “goo-goo” or “bah-bah.” At this age most also recognize their own name and a few other keywords that parents use frequently.

Nine Months

Around nine months of age, typically-developing babies have usually increased their range of tone and volume. They’ve also usually begun to babble in an increasing number of consonant sounds and to understand more of the words their caretakers use throughout their everyday lives.

One Year

Sometime around the one-year mark, babies begin to say words that their caretakers understand. While their sounds may still sound like babble to outsiders the adults that are with them each day are usually able to understand at least a few words.

Two years

Babies speech development between the first and second year varies widely. While some babies take to language very quickly, others tend to be a little slower to integrate new words and sounds. As long as babies speech is progressing, most parents don’t need to worry. By a baby's second birthday, they can typically string together simple, two-word sentence.

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As always, if you have concerns about your little one's development, you should reach out to your pediatrician and ask for a check-up!

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Baby Talk: Should You Be Worried About Your Baby’s Speech?

Julia Pelly has a master's degree in public health and works full time in the field of positive youth development. Julia loves hiking after work, swimming during the summer and taking long, cuddly afternoon naps with her two sons on the weekends. Julia lives in North Carolina, with her husband and two young boys. You can find more of her work at JuliaPelly.com ... More

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1 comment

  1. Theresa says:

    nice post. very helpful. go ahed

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