Is Surrogacy Only For Celebrities?

As the world anxiously awaits news of the Kardashian babies–one through recently-confirmed Khloe, one allegedly through a very mysterious Kylie, and one through Kimmy K's surrogate, it definitely brings up a lot of questions. Like, how much money can one family make? How long can Kylie stay hidden from the public eye? 

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But seriously, Kim's pregnancy has put surrogacy in the spotlight in a more public way than it has been in the past. While plenty of celebrities and high-profile couples have used surrogates, it hasn't necessarily been something that they have been loud and proud about. But Kim has hidden nothing about the fact that she has chosen to use a surrogate to bring her third child into the world. Kim has been open in the past about how hard pregnancy was on her body and after facing some complications with her second, she decided the risk was too great to go through pregnancy again. 

Of course, a lot of women don't have the option to use a surrogate, but then again, not every family might know what surrogacy really entails either. There are many options when a surrogate might be appropriate, from same-sex partners to women who can't physically get pregnant to women who may have too many complications during their pregnancies. 

surrogacy
Image via Unsplash/ freestocks.org

But is surrogacy something a mere mortal who is not a Kardashian could really consider? The answer is, it depends. Every family has its own financial considerations, as well as their own personal considerations that you can't necessarily put a cost on. And speaking of cost …

How much does surrogacy cost?

The cost of surrogacy ranges, but it can range from $60,000 and even cost upwards of over $100,000. According to Sensible Surrogacy, the base price you can expect surrogacy to cost is at least $90,000, and the price can vary a lot, depending on the medical needs of the surrogate, if insurance covers any costs, and any incidentals the pregnancy incurs. (Some parents, for example, opt to cover incident costs for the surrogate.) And then some states, such as Michigan, actually have laws preventing compensated surrogacy; instead, they only allow “compassionate” surrogacy.

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Does insurance cover surrogacy?

Like other aspects, there isn't an easy answer here, especially because surrogacy can be very unpredictable. A surrogate mother might give birth prematurely, for example, or have postpartum complications, making it difficult to know who is responsible for costs. If you do choose surrogacy through a surrogate organization or clinic, rest assured that a reputable clinic will ensure that all your bases are covered when it comes to insurance.

In some cases, your own personal medical insurance will cover some costs of the surrogacy, such as the fertility medications the surrogate might need. But in general, all of the “big” costs will be on you as the parents. 

Can you hire your own surrogate?

Technically, yes, but you have to be careful. There have been a lot of accounts of family members offering to be a surrogate for another family member, for instance, and while it's a beautiful, amazing gesture, it can also get complicated. There can be unforeseen medical issues, problems that can arise during the pregnancy or delivery, and unexpected costs that can crop up. You'll want to make sure you work with a lawyer to ensure that every base is covered. The last thing you want is to ruin a relationship through such a tremendous gift. 

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Could a surrogate be right for you?

There's no getting around it–hiring a surrogate comes with a lot of costs. If you are able to do a private surrogacy that doesn't use an agency, such as using a family member or friend, the costs might be lowered, but it can still come with a price. But some couples who want a child that is biologically related to them, it may be the only option and that's something that deserves to be considered. You'll also want to be sure that you familiarize yourself with surrogacy laws, as they can vary state by state. 

What do you think?

Is Surrogacy Only For Celebrities?

Chaunie Brusie is a coffee mug addict, a labor and delivery nurse turned freelance writer, and a young(ish) mom of four. She is the author of "Tiny Blue Lines: Preparing For Your Baby, Moving Forward In Faith, & Reclaiming Your Life In An Unplanned Pregnancy" and "The Moments That Made You A Mother". She also runs Passion Meets Practicality, a community of tips + inspiration for work-at-home mothers. ... More

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