A Kiss, or Lack Thereof, Worth $10,000

teens-kiss
Image via iStock

You've got rules at your house, right? I mean, if you've got teenagers, I know you've got some sort of rules that pertain to curfew or dating or language or cell-phone use or whether or not it is absolutely a requisite for the toilet seat to be returned to where it needs to be—up. I can still remember not being able to play Halo as a high schooler because it was rated “M.” This rule wasn't super unique to me, as I knew other people that lived with this rule (namely my younger siblings), but that was the rule, and I obeyed it.

{ MORE: Mom Gives Teen Smart Phone Under 18 Conditions }

But how sacred are these family rules to you? Would you be willing to put money on them, or do you just give lip service? Like, would you be willing to shell out $100 if your teenage girl was never late for curfew during a one-month time period? Or would you be willing to hand over $50 to your teenage son if he didn't cuss around his younger siblings during a certain time period?

Like I said before, certain families have certain rules, and that is totally up to them. 

A Utah mom had a a rule at her house that her kids weren't allowed to kiss anyone (excluding their mother, of course) until they reached the ripe old age of 16. She was so firm on the importance of this rule that she offered her teenage son and daughter a thousand bucks if they could make it to 16 without getting (or giving) a smooch. She went even farther and made a deal with each kid that she'd dole out ten grand if they tacked on two years and made it to 18. Ten grand! 

She thought she'd be pretty safe because, I mean, they're teenagers. Of course they're going to be wanting that kiss. Not to mention that if there's one word that describes teenagers to a T, it's “hormones.” 

Why did this mom make this wager, you ask? She said that, “It’s not that kissing is bad, but from there forward, there is nowhere to go but downhill. If you’re not kissing, other stuff doesn’t happen.” She was just trying to keep her kids from getting themselves into trouble, like, I dunno, a teenage pregnancy or sexual promiscuity, leading to a possibility of STDs and whatnot. 

{ MORE: Talking to Kids About Sex: An Awkward Mom’s Guide }

She may be guilty of the slippery slope fallacy, but she may also have found a point. Those are some things to think about.

What do you think about this? Is she robbing her kids of affection from possible suitors? Or is she doing a good job with instilling a “save your kisses” type of mindset? Let me know what you think!

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What do you think?

A Kiss, or Lack Thereof, Worth $10,000

Jace Whatcott is a self-diagnosed introvert who loves crossword puzzles, golf, and reading. Despite being a male contributor—one of the few on this particular website—he is not in unfamiliar territory. Because he is an English major, 90% of his classmates are females, so he’s not too worried about being a fish out of water. One of his favorite things to do is to raid local thrift stores for used books. He’s always looking for something to read, or for something to put on his endless to-r ... More

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1 comment

  1. Amanda says:

    I think its a good idea, but how would they prove it?

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