Cupcake Wars at School

cupcake

At pre-school, there are three approved “treats” for birthdays:  Jello, soft pretzels and popcorn. The times I have celebrated my own birthday with any of these three things: exactly zero. Oh, to be a kid today. Or, a parent that really wants to bring anything remotely laden with sugar.

During Christmas, my daughter and her father went to a gingerbread house workshop. Like every bakery, this place was overflowing with chocolate chips, sprinkled sugar, and dough. It smelled heavenly. On this day, there were large cups filled with the kinds of things you are most definitely never supposed to give your children anymore: M & M’s, butterscotch, marshmallows, Hershey kisses,  gummy bears and peppermints. I stopped for a moment to talk to the owner about her hard work and she said to me, brushing the “work” part off: “My life is filled with sugar and it’s amazing.”

In many places, that’s kind of a political statement. Take the bakery owner out of the bakery and put her near one of our kids and she would probably be committed.

Why hello, cupcake wars, it’s nice to meet you.

Yes, there is a show of the same name, but what I’m referring to is the onslaught of banning cupcakes and brownies and the mini donut holes that make children go bananas from classrooms. And what are they being replaced by? Celery. Or, if someone has a creative streak and a little time, fruit art.

Approved food lists because of allergies are a completely different story. For an increasing number of children, certain foods are dangerous.  I get that and I also accept it. When there isn’t an allergy involved? Sugar is fun, it’s delicious and I’m bringing it.

One of the lamest things I have ever heard (and that I used to – for a brief time – believe) is that food should not be used as a celebration. I’ve also been told to have my child avoid Cheerios because they are not-so-secret sugar pushers.

Please. That’s just ridiculous. When the opportunity arises for a full on sugar coma, Cheerios is the last thing I am thinking about.  Let’s get it on Ben AND Jerry.

Moderation is key and fruit and veggies are fabulous, but so is sugar which is exactly why I blew past the “approved” list and brought donut holes into pre-school. Rules, at least to me, are more like guidelines especially if no one is danger (there were no allergies). The only thing in danger was probably my good reputation, but I lost that years ago so it wasn’t really a threat.

Channeling headless Marie, I say: Let them eat cake!

ADVERTISEMENT

Image via Flickr [ginnerobot]

What do you think?

Cupcake Wars at School

Liz Henry is the irreverent voice behind the award-winning blog The Six Year Itch. She lives with her daughter and her partner, Slasher, in Philadelphia. That's not his real name and that's not her real hair color. Her soft middle is totally real. Liz graduated summa cum lazy with a degree in English literature, which means she knows how to write properly, but rarely does. She loves Harry Potter and Luna is her favorite. ... More

Tell us what you think!

8 comments

  1. Bunnybiter says:

    The way a person wants to parent is their choice, but when it comes to schools your choice is now as important as every other parent whose child attends. I think people are forgetting that at school, even preschool, staying middle ground is the only real option the system has. No one is saying you can’t give your kid doughnuts, cupcakes, or rice krispie treats on special occasions. Hell, they’re not even saying they can’t bring them to school for themselves, they’re just saying don’t give someone’s child those things.

    Also, on a side note, sugar can be dangerous without allergies. Granted we’re looking at .25% of the childhood population diagnosed with diabetes, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. That’s actually an equal number of lactose intolerant children. I’m not saying this is any reason to fret, but people seem to forget that diabetes can develop at any time just like an allergy.

  2. Candice says:

    A cupcake for kids b-dats is a great thing. Look they are not giving them everyday and if YOU don’t want your kid to have one that’s fine, but don’t force your restrictions on my child. Mine kid can have one every once and a while…you can’t stick a happy birthday or a candle in a apple.

  3. No more cupcakes in schools? Oh boy, am I ever going to be a pariah when my son starts school! I don’t care much for such "restrictions" and I will feed my kids whatever I damn well please. If that means that THEY get a cupcake in their lunch box on their birthdays and the other kids have to watch in envy, then so be it. Not MY fault that other moms are so uptight these days :p If those nasty girls in highschool taught me anything growing up it’s not to care what other people think of you.

  4. Janice says:

    My daughter has dealt with that at her girls school. They take a snake, to share with class, but no sugar treats.

  5. Francesca says:

    I understand both sides. When I was in elementary school I always looked forward to kids’ birthdays because it meant treats! But with so many sugar-strict parents these days, it would be unfair to bring treats not all the kids can eat.

  6. Jenness says:

    As a school nurse, I have to share my two cents. A person can develop a food allergy at any time. Two years ago I had a Kindergarten student with no history of allergies develop a life threatening reaction to some Chinese food the class had during a unit studying Asia. Fortunately the district I worked for has a standing order to administer an Epi-Pen for such times. Last year a fourth grade student developed hives, itchiness, and trouble breathing after eating a fresh peach, and again I gave him an Epi-Pen. He had eaten peaches many times before. Two weeks later he reacted to a red delicious apple, but not quite as severely. With 850 students in my school now, I have over 50 prescribed Epi-Pens! I am a big advocate for no food brought into the school for group consumption!!!

  7. Jenness says:

    As a school nurse, i have to share my two cents… A person can develop a food allergy at any time. I had a kindergarten student two years ago without any allergy history develop a severe allergic reaction requiring the administration of an Epi-Pen after eating some Chinese food during a school unit on Asia. Last year I had to administer an Epi-Pen to a 10 year old student who was experiencing hives, itchiness, and trouble breathing after eating a fresh peach, which he had eaten many times before. With 850 students, I have over 50 students with a prescription for an Epi-Pen. I fully advocate no food to be brought into the school for group consumption.

  8. This is a great blog! I agree with you. Everything in moderation. And seriously, who doesn’t want a cupcake party for their kid’s birthday. Mine will have one, even if the school wants to change it to a celery and carrot stick party. I’m with you, let them eat (some) cake!

Advertisement
[x]
×

EverydayFamily.com Week-by-Week Newsletter

Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year! Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year!

Due Date or Baby's Birth Date


By clicking the "Join Now" button you are agreeing to the terms of use and privacy policy.

Send this to a friend