Co-Parenting On Valentine’s Day: How Kindness Can Help

If you and your child’s other parent recently split up, the very last thing you might want to do is help your child prepare gifts or a card for them. While the idea might sound unpleasant, there are a lot of reasons why you might want to do it anyway. Check out the list below of reasons helping your child make a Valentine’s day gift for your co-parent can be meaningful.

co-parent
Image via Unsplash/ NeONBRAND

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Kids often can’t buy or make gifts on their own but feel bad when they don’t have anything to give.

While young kids often want to make or give gifts, they usually don’t have the agency to go to the store or gather the supplies they need to make something all on their own. Not being able to do something though doesn't mean that kids don’t feel bad when they don’t have anything to give Don’t let your child feel guilty this Valentine’s day and help them prepare something for your co-parent.

It can set a great example for your child.

One day, when your child grows up, they’ll probably start dating. When they do you’ll want them to be kind, courteous, and respectful. Even though you and their co-parent aren't together anymore, you’re likely one of their primary examples of what a romantic relationship or any sort of adult relationship looks like. Set an example this Valentine's day of what it looks like to be graceful and kind, even if you’re not feeling the love towards your co-parent.

It shows your little one that you put them first.

Sometimes, kids might want to ask for help on tasks like this but don’t because they worry they’ll upset one parent or another. Show your child that the only thing they’re in the middle of is a whole bunch of love by offering to help them on this sort of task.

It can be fun.

While it might not seem like it now, crafting with your child, even if it’s for your co-parent, can be fun. Instead of focusing the whole activity on your co-parent, set aside some time to make cards for everyone your babe loves and simply include your co-parent. Among the glitter, glue, and giggles you might just find yourself having a great time.

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The other parent likely won’t get anything otherwise.

This is a classic treat-others-as-you’d-like-to-be-treated situation. While you might not feel the love towards your co-parent, acting like you do will help give them a special day and, perhaps, a card they just might cherish for years to come. Chances are, if you set the tone, your co-parent might follow suit next the next holiday that rolls around!

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Co-Parenting On Valentine’s Day: How Kindness Can Help

Julia Pelly has a master's degree in public health and works full time in the field of positive youth development. Julia loves hiking after work, swimming during the summer and taking long, cuddly afternoon naps with her two sons on the weekends. Julia lives in North Carolina, with her husband and two young boys. You can find more of her work at JuliaPelly.com ... More

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