Blowing Out the Candles Banned for Australian Kids

candles

Birthday parties have provided children a break from the monotony of the school day for as long as anyone can remember. But new health guidelines in Australia are putting an end to a birthday party tradition.

The National Health and Medical Research Council has announced that children can no longer blow out the candles on communal cakes at school birthday parties due to a concern over the spread of germs. 

Australian parents are anything but happy over the new health standards. A parent told the Daily Telegraph they think children are being protected too much.  “Let the kids be kids, get some germs, build up the immunity, and get on with it. How about the politicians focus on getting other things right.” 

Australian medical authorities seem to agree that the rules, though well intentioned, have gone too far. Other rules included for childcare providers are:

  • All toys, door handles, floors, bathrooms, and cushion covers have to be washed every day. (That's quite the additional task for a teacher or school janitor)
  • Sick children must stay at home whether or not they have a doctor’s note saying that they can go back.
  • Kids must wash their hands before and after playing outside.

Even the Australian Medical Association has warned that the new rules may be detrimental, instead of beneficial, to kids’ health.

“These so-called experts who seem to know more about health than doctors, won't be happy until kids are kept in a sterile environment, which will then put the child at risk every time it leaves the house,” said a scrub nurse from New South Wales. 

Here in the states, it isn't commonplace to have candles lit in the classroom, but the idea that blowing out candles will spread too many germs seems a bit extreme. Apparently, if cupcakes are brought in, a candle can still be lit. What about the concern over fire hazards if we're talking overall child safety concerns? Having matches, lighters and fire starting devices in schools would be more problematic than the germs spread by blowing out candles, wouldn't it? 

Are the new standards going to help keep kids healthy, or has the NHMRC gone too far? Do your kids get to blow out candles at their schools?

Image via Flickr

ADVERTISEMENT

What do you think?

Blowing Out the Candles Banned for Australian Kids

Tell us what you think!

1 comment

  1. ErinF says:

    I always thought that eating cake that someone had just blown all over was a little gross, but banning it is silly. If they’re in the same classroom, breathing the same air, putting their hands all over the same supplies, they’ve most likely already been exposed to any germs their classmates might be carrying. Unless there’s something serious like a meningitis outbreak going on, ingesting a little saliva-seasoned cake won’t put the kids at any more of a risk.

Advertisement
[x]
×

EverydayFamily.com Week-by-Week Newsletter

Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year! Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year!

Due Date or Baby's Birth Date


By clicking the "Join Now" button you are agreeing to the terms of use and privacy policy.

Send this to a friend