Baby Health: What’s Normal After Shots?

Despite the fact that the routine childhood vaccines recommended by the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have been proven safe and effective, many parents worry about what could happen when they take their baby to receive their shots. If your baby's shots are approaching, and you’re feeling worried about whether they might have a reaction, familiarizing yourself with what is normal can help you feel more comfortable about the process. Check out the list below to find out what sort of totally normal reaction your baby might have after shots.

shots
Image via Unsplash/ Colin

Crying

It never feels good to cause a baby pain but, when you get your baby the vaccines they need you are preventing them from the potential of feeling a lot more pain than a small stick could cause down the line. When your baby gets their shots they might cry: this is totally normal and most babies stop crying within a minute or so of receiving their vaccines. Many parents find that breastfeeding, cuddling, or offering their baby a bottle soon after, or even during, their shots can help reduce their fear, pain, or discomfort.

Redness or slight swelling at the shot site

Redness or slight swelling around the shot site is a common, normal reaction to receiving a vaccine. Often, parents will notice redness or slight swelling within a few hours of their baby receiving their shots. While it may look uncomfortable, most babies are not bothered or sore as a result of any redness or slight swelling. If you’re concerned or your baby is acting distressed, you should always call your pediatrician, but if all you’re seeing is some slight swelling or redness around your baby’s shot site, this is well within the range of normal. 

Fussiness or fever

While redness and swelling are typically confined to the site of the shot, sometimes babies can develop more generalized reactions to receiving their shots. Some babies will act a little bit more fussy for a day or so after they receive their shots or run a low-grade fever. While this can be unpleasant, it’s usually nothing to worry about.

{ MORE: How to Treat a Cold Sore in Babies }

If you’re worried about your baby getting their shots, you should talk over the benefits with your doctor and share any concerns you might have. Similarly, if your baby has already received their shots and you’re worried about anything they seem to be experiencing you should call your baby’s pediatrician.  

ADVERTISEMENT

What do you think?

Baby Health: What’s Normal After Shots?

Julia Pelly has a master's degree in public health and works full time in the field of positive youth development. Julia loves hiking after work, swimming during the summer and taking long, cuddly afternoon naps with her two sons on the weekends. Julia lives in North Carolina, with her husband and two young boys. You can find more of her work at JuliaPelly.com ... More

Tell us what you think!

Advertisement
[x]
×

EverydayFamily.com Week-by-Week Newsletter

Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year! Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year!

Due Date or Baby's Birth Date


By clicking the "Join Now" button you are agreeing to the terms of use and privacy policy.

Send this to a friend