5 Reasons to Start a Family Book Club

bookclub
Image via Katie Hurley

Reading forces us to unplug, disconnect from the outside world, and focus on the here and now. It’s both a relaxation strategy and a vehicle for family bonding.

Book clubs are popular among adults for a variety of reasons. Perhaps it’s the camaraderie of the monthly meeting, or maybe it’s the great escape that a book provides, coupled with a lively discussion among peers. It might even have something to do with the refreshments served on the side.

Whatever the reason, book clubs provide a great forum for friendship, discussion, and reading.

So why not form a family book club? Whether you keep it simple and have a monthly book club meeting within your own family, or you invite a few neighbors to participate, a family book club is an excellent way to promote a love of reading while spending time together.

It’s a win/win.

5 reasons to start a family book club:

 

Image via Flickr/
Image via Flickr/John-Morgan

It promotes literacy:

It’s no big secret that reading promotes literacy, but life can get busy (even for kids), and sometimes reading for fun gets pushed aside.

Reading builds your child’s vocabulary and introduces him or her to new concepts and ideas. Getting together as a family to discuss a book helps your child learn to analyze the text. This will help your child develop a better understanding of the themes contained within the book.

Image via Flickr/
Image via Flickr/Stijlfoto

It increases family bonding:

Whether you read a chapter book as a family or read to each child individually, time spent snuggled up and getting lost in a good book is good for the parent-child bond. Reading forces us to unplug, disconnect from the outside world, and focus on the here and now. It’s both a relaxation strategy and a vehicle for family bonding.

Coming together to discuss a certain book provides focused family time. It gives each family member the opportunity to feel heard and understood. It’s a great way to spend time together.  

{ MORE: Reading Makes Families Closer }

ADVERTISEMENT

reading time

It improves social/communication skills:

Being part of a book group means taking turns, listening to others, and sharing thoughts and ideas. These are all skills that kids need to practice. Listening skills might be required in the classroom, but the real world isn't set up like a classroom.  Kids need to hone these skills by practicing them in various settings.

Discussing the characters and themes contained within the book is a great way to work on social-interaction skills. By pointing out and talking about lessons learned in the context of the story, problem-solving skills utilized by the characters, and conflict resolution strategies that were introduced in the book, kids can begin to apply these lessons to their own experiences.

Image via Flickr/
Image via Flickr/KOMUnews

It builds assertiveness:

When kids get to take turns choosing the book and leading the discussion, they get to take center stage. They can showcase their thoughts and ideas with a captive audience. It gives quiet kids a chance to share something meaningful and a chance to practice leading a conversation in a safe environment.  

{ MORE: Should You Go to All of Your Kids' Activities? }

Image via Flickr/
Image via Flickr/Vimages

It makes reading fun!:

Turn book-group meetings into an adventure each month with snacks and craft activities that match the theme of the book. Adapt the story into a play. Turn your family room into a favorite scene from the book.

Reading should be a fun adventure for kids, not a chore. Presenting reading in an exciting format and including the whole family shows kids that reading really is a great escape. 

{ MORE: It's Almost National Puzzle Day: How Will You Celebrate? }

What is your family's favorite book to read together? 

Read More

What do you think?

5 Reasons to Start a Family Book Club

Katie Hurley, LCSW is a Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist and writer in Los Angeles, CA. She is the author of "No More Mean Girls: The Secret to Raising Strong, Confident, and Compassionate Girls" and "The Happy Kid Handbook: How to Raise Joyful Children in a Stressful World". She earned her BA in Psychology and Women's Studies from Boston College and her MSW from the University of Pennsylvania. She divides her time between her family, her private practice and her writing. Passionate about he ... More

Tell us what you think!

3 comments

  1. mommy nhoj says:

    I am actually planning to start building a library for my baby. I hope to start on it before she turns 1. I also wanted to rebuild my library since I left ALL my books overseas!

  2. Jessica says:

    I absolutely love this idea!! My grandfather was the one who really got me started on reading and to this day, I’m still an avid book reader!! Although I’m currently pregnant with my first child, I really want to read out loud books for my baby to hear and once he or she is born, continue that! I hope that I can cultivate their creativity and their love for books!

Advertisement
[x]
×

EverydayFamily.com Week-by-Week Newsletter

Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year! Receive weekly updates on your pregnancy or new baby’s development as well as Free Stuff, Special Offers, Product Samples, Coupons, Checklists and Tools you can use today, and more from EverydayFamily! Plus all new members are entered to win FREE diapers for a year!

Due Date or Baby's Birth Date


By clicking the "Join Now" button you are agreeing to the terms of use and privacy policy.

Send this to a friend