Dr. Anna Kaplan

Dr. Anna L. Kaplan is a mother of one, freelance writer, and licensed physician. Dr. Kaplan received her B.A. in English Literature from Pomona College, and her M.D. from U.S.C. School of Medicine. She completed a 3 year residency and board certification in Family Practice. She was in active practice for 15 years. Dr. Kaplan has written in the medical field for both consumers as well as professionals. She has also authored hundreds of articles on other subjects.

Dr. Anna L. Kaplan is a mother of one, freelance writer, and licensed physician. Dr. Kaplan received her B.A. in English Literature from Pomona College, and her M.D. from U.S.C. School of Medicine. She completed a 3 year residency and board certification in Family Practice. She was in active practice for 15 years. Dr. Kaplan has written in the medical field for both consumers as well as professionals. She has also authored hundreds of articles on other subjects.

Fetal Genetic Testing

Monday, July 29th, 2013 by from Blogs
Did you know? Parents-to-be with family histories of any genetic disorder can check their baby for carrier status. ...

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Does your preschooler show symptoms of ADHD? ...

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5 Signs of Dehydration

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013 by from Blogs
The definition of dehydration in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary is as good as any other: "an abnormal depletion of body fluids." The human body needs a certain amount of fluid for everything to function properly. For example, the kidneys need fluid to filter and clean the blood. We lose fluid every day through our ...

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If you suspect your child might be getting slightly dehydrated, but she does not appear very ill, you can try to treat her at home. Treatment means keeping up with her fluid needs. You should offer her small, frequent sources of rehydration solutions, such as Pedialyte, for about four hours. If ...

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Every mother anticipates the moment after delivery when she first sees her newborn baby. Most of the time, somewhere around 90% of full-term deliveries are uncomplicated. In this case, the baby will be put directly on the mother's abdomen, gently dried, and evaluated right there. Sometimes, ...

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Children and teenagers with celiac disease (also known as gluten intolerance) often enjoy summer camp if they get the opportunity to go, just like their friends without celiac disease. The difficulty lies in finding a camp that can promise to offer a gluten-free diet. As it turns out, there now are camps ...

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If your baby was born early, you may have questions about how this will affect her development. In the most general of terms, if she has no serious problems due to prematurity, she will hit major milestones at the age as she would have if she had been born at the expected time. The length ...

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All infants are susceptible to viral infections, but premature infants are even more susceptible. Normally, newborn infants have two ways to fight off viruses. One is from the antibodies their mothers produce to viral infections. These antibodies pass to the baby through the placenta. However, this ...

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Your body needs iron to make red blood cells. Healthy infants are born with enough iron to last for about six months. After that, they need iron from what they eat. Human breast milk is an excellent source of iron for babies. Infants ages 7 to 12 months old need 11 mg of iron per day. Children ...

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Most of the time, when people talk about calcium they're concerned about older people developing weak bones, or osteoporosis. Younger people may not have osteoporosis, but they still need calcium just as much. Calcium is a mineral that is critical for the formation of strong bones, as well as proper ...

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