Katie Hurley

Katie Hurley, LCSW is a Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist and writer in Los Angeles, CA. She is the author of "The Happy Kid Handbook: How to Raise Joyful Children in a Stressful World". She earned her BA in Psychology and Women's Studies from Boston College and her MSW from the University of Pennsylvania. She divides her time between her family, her private practice and her writing. Passionate about helping parents enjoy the ride, she provides parent education and simple strategies to take the guesswork out of difficult parenting situations. You can find her at Practical Parenting. She lives in the South Bay area of Los Angeles with her rock & roll husband and her two children, Riley and Liam.

Katie Hurley, LCSW is a Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist and writer in Los Angeles, CA. She is the author of "The Happy Kid Handbook: How to Raise Joyful Children in a Stressful World". She earned her BA in Psychology and Women's Studies from Boston College and her MSW from the University of Pennsylvania. She divides her time between her family, her private practice and her writing. Passionate about helping parents enjoy the ride, she provides parent education and simple strategies to take the guesswork out of difficult parenting situations. You can find her at Practical Parenting. She lives in the South Bay area of Los Angeles with her rock & roll husband and her two children, Riley and Liam.

Many parents reach out to me with concerns about preschool at the beginning of a new school year. They list off the things their child can do – count, name colors, identify shapes, spell her name, and more. The concern most often cited by worried parents, however, has nothing to do with counting, colors, or shapes. It has to do with whether or ...

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I will never forget the moment when my oldest child transitioned from a very quiet crawler to a talkative, action-packed, always climbing, sometimes nay-saying toddler with tons of thoughts and opinions on just about everything. It was exciting in the beginning. Talking! Ideas! Constant singing! Then came the "no"s, the moments of frustration, and ...

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If you have a toddler on your hands, chances are you are well acquainted with the word “no.” Some days it might even feel like “no” is all you ever hear. Are you hungry? NO! Do you want to go to the park? NO! Do you want to play with your toys? NO! Sometimes toddlers give a loud and forceful “NO!” right before they do what they just ...

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“Do it myself!” “No!” “Go away!” Sound familiar? If these phrases are on repeat in your house, it can only mean one thing: Toddlerhood. And with toddlerhood comes toddler independence. The toddler years mark a period of immense growth and development, both physically and emotionally. And toddlers are often known for their desire for ...

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A young child confided in me that she doesn’t actually like the summer months. I was surprised when she said it. I’ve been working with kids of all ages for nearly two decades and one thing I hear over and over again is that summer is the best time of the year. No homework. No busy schedules. Lower stress all around. With one exception. “My ...

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In the early years, parents often engineer friendships for kids simply by spending time with their friends who also have kids around the same age. This can actually be a great first step toward learning how to make friends. Through these group play experiences, young children learn how to play with other kids, how to handle early conflict (ex: ...

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A ten-year-old sits in my office, describing a feeling of hopelessness. He’s different than everyone else. He has no friends, he’s not smart enough, he’s not sporty enough. Really, he’s not enough of anything. He doesn’t know where he fits and he feels down all the time. This is not how his mom, teachers, or coaches see him. But this is ...

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It’s no big secret that pregnancy cues your body to produce lots of hormones or that those hormones can affect you both physically and emotionally. It’s common to feel fatigued, forgetful, or moody at various points during your pregnancy. You might also find that you begin to worry about or focus on practical matters like managing pregnancy ...

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Coping with Traumatic Birth

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 by from Baby Steps
A new mother tried her best to recall the birth of her firstborn son. She remembers heading to the hospital after her water broke. She remembers checking in and settling in a room. Very clearly she remembers the smile of the first nurse she encountered. Then her memory gets a little hazy. ...

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At a recent parent education night at a preschool, I spoke at length about mindfulness. Kids today, even the little ones, are on the treadmill. They’re running from activity to activity and switching gears quickly. They’re interrupted from their play frequently and expected to simply move on. They’re learning to survive in a state of stress, ...

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