8 Things to Think About When Deciding to Go It Alone: Getting Pregnant When You’re Single

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If you are considering having a baby without being in a relationship, you aren’t alone. As of 2009, children of single parents accounted for 40 percent of the US population, according to the NY Times. Whether you have decided to become a single mother out of necessity, or think it is the only option for you at this time, take some time to look at the whole picture. As a single mother, you should be prepared for certain challenges along the way that will develop as a result of your situation. Here are eight essential things you should consider before making the leap into parenthood as a single mother.

{ MORE: Study Says it's Safe to Get Pregnant Right After a Miscarriage }

Fertility: If you are a mother who is over the age of 35, you’ll have less of a chance of getting pregnant than if you were in your 20s. You may need to consider seeing a fertility specialist to help you to conceive.

Artificial Insemination: Consider the process of choosing a sperm donor, if you want to get pregnant without a partner.

Father’s Rights: If you don’t want to have the father in the child’s life, you need to consider his legal rights, and get a lawyer. Have the court grant you sole custody or terminate the father’s rights; otherwise, the father may decide he wants to be a part of the child’s life and will have every right to do so.

Finances: Be prepared financially before having a child in order to avoid unnecessary stress. Because you’ll be the sole supporter of your child, you’ll need to make sure you have enough money to cover at least six months of rent, utilities, and expenses, as well as life insurance in case you die, a will to protect your child’s custody, and a steady job.

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8 Things to Think About When Deciding to Go It Alone: Getting Pregnant When You’re Single

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15 comments

  1. Jane says:

    None of my pregnancies were easy (no energy to microwave leftovers for supper), and my first child was my WORST labor/sleeper/nurser, so even if I only had him I still would have been in for all the rough transitions. It’s hard enough when you’re in a marriage with a helpful and faithful man, I can’t imagine signing up to do this alone.

  2. Jane says:

    None of my pregnancies were easy (no energy to microwave leftovers for supper), and my first child was my WORST labor/sleeper/nurser, so even if I only had him I still would have been in for all the rough transitions. It’s hard enough being in a marriage with a helpful and faithful man, I can’t imagine signing up to do this alone.

  3. amy says:

    You know everyone has a right to be happy,and have a family. There are alot of single mom and dads out there that are doing it alone for one reason or another, so if a person is financially able ,and ready to start there family on there own i say more power to them. And i wish them the best of luck

  4. LIZ says:

    this is very interesting article my friend is considering this option

  5. Ryan says:

    I think this article could be helpful if I could get over the jab at churches… If people judge you, you just have to forgive them and not let it bother you…as hard as that is, it’s doable. As far as going it alone I think if you can afford it more power to you, the traditional family is not the only way nor is it the “right” way for everyone.

  6. tangled says:

    Single mother is the best way to go

  7. Jeanna says:

    It just seems selfish to me. Its never an ideal situation for a child. I was raised by a single mother who I love to pieces… but, it was by no means an ideal situation. Its not impossible… but it seems selfish.

  8. Lulu says:

    Single parenthood is hard, but not impossible.

  9. why was lack of a father in the child’s life not listed?

  10. I couldn’t imagine doing this alone. I am very lucky to be part of a team.

  11. Jeanetta says:

    The father of my baby is in my life some what and he say’s he wants to be apart of our daughters life but I’m the one doing everything and taking care of everything so I feel like and think of myself as a single parent.

    • Kelly says:

      Jeanetta- It may seem difficult and never ending my daughter is 11 and her father is the same way including time with her and $10 a week in support payments(not what he is ordered to pay) but stay strong and always remember the time with the father is not yours to take away because of what he has not done but to be a step in the right direction by him. Even if it is only for a minute. So many people I know prevent the child from seeing the other parent because they are not receiving the support they are due or because of broken promises to visit or what have you. I have to tell you; I have always allowed my daughter visiting time with her father as long as there was a safe eviroment and he was not impaired in any way. She went 5 years without seeing him no fault of mine or lack of me trying to track him down when she asked me to find daddy. HEartbreaking to say the least. Keep you chin up it is hard but know you are doing right by your child and that is all that matters. I am a single mother and I am 11 years later expecting another bundle of joy with a man I Love but not married too; single yes and no on this one but things are rock so I can be going this alone. Am I scared worried Heck Yeah but will I let that hinder me???????? No way becasue only the children suffer.

  12. Julie says:

    Well, most of it sounds the same as if you were married anyway. I don’t see anything wrong with wanting to be a single mother.

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