17 Tips About Nosebleeds: Precautions, Types, & Ways to Stop the Bleeding

girl noseGetting a nosebleed can be a frightening experience, for both you and your child, but chances are good that it will eventually happen. Statistics show that epistaxis, or bleeding from the nose, happens to 1 out of 7 people in the United States, and is most common between ages 2 to 10 and 50 to 80 years old.

Nosebleeds can be caused by a variety of factors, such as dry air, drug use, allergies, certain medications, and even continuous nose blowing from a simple cold. Even though it may appear that the blood loss is great, that very rarely is the case.

While some people are more prone to nosebleeds, there are several precautions that can be taken to lower the chances of developing epistaxis.

Precautions

  • Run a humidifier to avoid dry air.
  • Gently apply A & D ointment, or Vaseline, to the inside of the nose with a swab.
  • Use a nasal saline spray to keep the membranes moist.
  • Avoid heavy lifting or straining, and avoid forceful nose blowing.
  • Wear protective athletic equipment.

Nosebleeds can sometimes cause blood in the saliva, or even cause one to vomit blood.

The majority of nosebleeds stem from one nostril, but can overflow into the other. or the throat, thus causing even more unnecessary strife. It is important to realize that nosebleeds can sometimes cause blood in the saliva or even cause one to vomit blood.

Also notable is that the nasolacrimal duct connects to nasal sinuses, so blood may even appear in the corners of the eye. Truly excessive blood loss produces symptoms of dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, or even fainting.

Types of Nosebleeds

There are two types of nosebleeds; anterior and posterior. 90% of nosebleeds are anterior and are considered minor, with no cause for concern. However, posterior nosebleeds typically present more of a problem. Below you will find the major differences between the two.

Anterior Nosebleeds:

  • originate in the front of the nose;
  • usually are caused by broken capillaries, or small blood vessels;
  • commonly are triggered by extensive nose blowing during a cold; and,
  • can be stopped fairly quickly and without much ado.

Posterior Nosebleeds:

  • originate in the deepest arteries located in the back of the nose;
  • typically cause blood to flow down back of throat;
  • can be hard to control, even in standing and sitting positions; and,
  • occur more often in older people, those with facial injury, or those with high blood pressure.

Despite the type of nosebleed one has, the steps to alleviate it are generally the same. First and foremost, it is important to remain calm. The calmer you are, the less scary the situation is, and the quicker it will clear up.

Stopping a Nosebleed

  • Lean forward as much as possible and apply pressure to nose with a soft tissue or cloth.
  • Pinch squishy part of nostrils together and hold consistently for 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Keep head elevated and follow the rule: “Head above heart.”
  • DO NOT put head between legs.

If the above steps don’t seem to be working, you can also try putting a cold compress, such as a washcloth, ice pack, or even a frozen sponge, over the bridge of the nose. Doing so will cause the blood vessels to constrict and slow blood flow.

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It is suggested to call your doctor if you have repeated episodes, additional bleeding from other places, such as blood in the urine or stool, you are on blood thinners, or if you bruise easily.

Immediately go see your doctor if the bleeding does not stop after 20 minutes, it is in combination with a headache, after a severe facial injury, or if you develop blurry vision or loss of consciousness.

 

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17 Tips About Nosebleeds: Precautions, Types, & Ways to Stop the Bleeding

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1 comment

  1. great information, thanks 🙂

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